What to do before buying a house in Atlanta

What to do before buying a house. Atlanta homes for Sale

What to do before buying a house

What to do before buying a house in Atlanta

You might be ready to buy a home, but are you armed with the knowledge you need? Do you know about credit score requirements? Are you familiar with flexible standards on Federal Housing Administration loans?

Whether you are a first-time homebuyer or an experienced owner, buying a house requires a “preflight check,” in the words of Barry Zigas, director of housing policy for the Consumer Federation of America.

Here is a six-item checklist, including tips on two types of savings you need, plus advice about what’s more important than buying a house for its resale value.

 Don’t buy if you can’t stay put

If you can’t commit to remaining in one place for at least a few years, then owning is probably not for you, at least not yet. With the transaction costs of buying and selling a home, you may end up losing money if you sell any sooner – even in a rising market. When prices are falling, it’s an even worse proposition.

Aim for a home you can really afford

The rule of thumb is that you can buy housing that runs about two-and-one-half times your annual salary. But you’ll do better to use one of many calculators available online to get a better handle on how your income, debts, and expenses affect what you can afford.

Buy in a district with good schools

In most areas, this advice applies even if you don’t have school-age children. Reason: When it comes time to sell, you’ll learn that strong school districts are a top priority for many home buyers, thus helping to boost property values.

Get professional help

Even though the Internet gives buyers unprecedented access to home listings, most new buyers (and many more experienced ones) are better off using a professional agent. Look for an exclusive buyer agent, if possible, who will have your interests at heart and can help you with strategies during the bidding process.

Choose carefully between points and rate

When picking a mortgage, you usually have the option of paying additional points — a portion of the interest that you pay at closing — in exchange for a lower interest rate. If you stay in the house for a long time — say three to five years or more — it’s usually a better deal to take the points. The lower interest rate will save you more in the long run.

Before house hunting, get pre-approved

Getting pre-approved will you save yourself the grief of looking at houses you can’t afford and put you in a better position to make a serious offer when you do find the right house. Not to be confused with pre-qualification, which is based on a cursory review of your finances, pre-approval from a lender is based on your actual income, debt and credit history.

Do your homework before bidding

Your opening bid should be based on the sales trend of similar homes in the neighborhood. So before making it, consider sales of similar homes in the last three months. If homes have recently sold at 5 percent less than the asking price, you should make a bid that’s about eight to 10 percent lower than what the seller is asking.

Hire a home inspector

Sure, your lender will require a home appraisal anyway. But that’s just the bank’s way of determining whether the house is worth the price you’ve agreed to pay. Separately, you should hire your own home inspector, preferably an engineer with experience in doing home surveys in the area where you are buying. His or her job will be to point out potential problems that could require costly repairs down the road

Strengthen your credit score

“It’s a brave, new world with respect to credit requirements for mortgages,” says John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at smartcredit.com and formerly of FICO, which pioneered credit scoring.

One old rule still applies: The higher your credit score, the lower your down payment and monthly payments.

“Below 660 or 680, you’re either going to have to pay sizable fees or a higher down payment,” Zigas says. And that’s pretty much the cutoff score for getting a mortgage, he says.

Vicki Bott, deputy assistant secretary for single-family housing at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, says that her office has noticed much the same thing. “While there are many qualified borrowers in the 580 range, the market today is probably (looking for) 640 to 660, at a minimum,” Bott says.

On the other end, a score of 700 to 720 will get you a good deal and 750 and above will garner the best rates on the market, Ulzheimer says.

Improve your chances by: pulling your credit reports and ensuring you’re not being unfairly penalized for old, paid or settled debts, Zigas says.

Stop applying for new credit a year before you apply for financing. And keep the moratorium in place until after you close on your home, Ulzheimer says.

Figure out how much you can afford–

The buyer’s mantra: Get a home that’s financially comfortable.

There are various rules of thumb that will help you get an idea of how much home you can afford. If you’re using FHA financing, as almost one-fifth of buyers get FHA-insured loans, your home payment can’t exceed 31 percent of your monthly income. But, with some mitigating factors, FHA will let you go higher.

For conventional loans, a safe formula is that home expenses should not exceed 28 percent of your gross monthly income, says Susan Tiffany, director of consumer periodicals for the Credit Union National Association.

For a rough assessment of how much house you can afford, check out Bankrate’s new house calculator.

Improve your chances by: trying on that financial obligation long before you sign the mortgage papers, says Tiffany. Before you home shop, calculate the mortgage payment for the home in your intended price range, along with the increased expenses (such as taxes, insurance and utilities). Then bank the difference between that and what you’re paying now.

Not only does it allow you to build a nice nest egg, but “you can back away from it,” or scale back, if the payments start to pinch, she says.

Save for down payment and closing costs

Depending on your credit and financing, you’ll typically need to save enough money to put anywhere from 3.5 percent to 20 percent down.

If you’re using FHA financing, then you need a score of 500 or higher. And in the 500 to 579 range, if you can find a lender, you’ll have to put 10 percent down instead of 3.5 percent.

One exception: Veterans Affairs loans, which require no down payment.

Another cash expense: closing costs. Whatever your loan source, you’ll also need money to pay closing costs, which run (depending on where you live), from $2,300 to $4,000. Get the average closing costs in your state at Bankrate’s closing costs map.

Improve your chances by: Along with banking your own money, search out down payment assistance, Tiffany says. Often it’s location-based or tagged to a certain type of buyer, like first-timers, she says. So do an Internet search with the city name, then the county name, along with word combinations such as “down payment assistance,” “first-time homebuyers” and “homebuyer’s assistance.”

In a buyer’s market, you can also negotiate to have the seller pay a portion of the closing costs.

Build a healthy savings account

This is over and above your money for the down payment and closing. Your lender wants to see that you’re not living paycheck to paycheck. If you have three to five months’ worth of mortgage payments set aside, that makes you a much better loan candidate. And some lenders and backers, like the FHA, will give you a little more latitude on other factors if they see that you save a cash cushion.

That money will also help you with maintenance and repair issues that come up when you own a home. While repairs are sporadic, items such as a new roof, water heater or other big-ticket items can hit suddenly and hard.

Improve your chances by: setting aside money every month. A good rule of thumb: on average you’ll spend 2.5 percent to 3 percent of your home’s value annually on upkeep, repairs and maintenance, says Joseph Gyourko, chairman of the real estate department at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. If you’re buying a $250,000 home, aim to bank $520 to $625 per month.

Get preapproved for a mortgage

For serious home shoppers, “the No. 1 thing is they better have everything in order,” says Dick Gaylord, past president of the National Association of Realtors. That means that, before the real home shopping begins, you want to get financing in place, he says.

And the preapproval process is “much more extensive” than it was a few years ago, he says.

Bott agrees. “That documentation around income and assets is very essential, more so than in the last five years,” she says.

Improve your chances by: getting financing in place “before you walk through the first house,” Gaylord says. Otherwise, he says, “How do you know how much you can afford?”

Buy a house you like

If you’re buying today for yourself and your family, you want a home that will make you happy for the next few years.

Gone are the days when you could count on a quick sale, Tiffany says. And depending on how much you put down, and how much you have to shell out to sell and relocate, short-term ownership can be a pretty expensive proposition.

Improve your chances by: stepping back, Gyourko says, and making certain “you like the house.”

Search Homes for Sale in Atlanta

Foreign Real Estate Investors: How to Purchase Real Estate in the USA?

Telmo Bermeo Real Estate Broker

About Telmo Bermeo

Small Business Owner, specializes in marketing homes for sale in the Atlanta Area by using the most up to date Internet Marketing Tools.

Real Estate Broker serving the Atlanta Metro Area, for over 12 years. If you are planning to buy or sell your home in Atlanta, call Telmo Bermeo at 770-309-6417

More Posts By Telmo Bermeo

Atlanta Real Estate

New Listing - 2 weeks online
$210,000
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
4
BED
4
TOTAL BATHS
2,601
SQFT
6796 Foxfire Place Place SW
Atlanta, GA 30349
COOKS LANDING Subdivision
$283,951
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
3
BED
2
TOTAL BATHS
1,802
SQFT
673 Python Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
Camden Manor Subdivision
$330,349
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
5
BED
4
TOTAL BATHS
3,363
SQFT
7064 Demeter Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
Camden Manor Subdivision
$299,026
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
5
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
3,040
SQFT
7057 Demeter Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
Camden Manor Subdivision
Price Change - 3 weeks ago
$329,990
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
6
BED
4
TOTAL BATHS
3,363
SQFT
663 Python Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
Camden Manor Subdivision
New Listing - 3 weeks online
$310,270
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
4
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
3,236
SQFT
7024 Demeter Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
Camden Manor Subdivision
$312,132
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
4
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
2,544
SQFT
7014 Demeter Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
Camden Manor Subdivision
$301,438
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
5
BED
4
TOTAL BATHS
3,040
SQFT
7007 Demeter Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
Camden Manor Subdivision
Foreclosure
$215,000
Single Family Home For Sale
Pending
4
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
3,080
SQFT
6629 Overlook Ridge
Atlanta, GA 30349
Cooks Landing Subdivision
$171,995
Townhouse For Sale
Active
3
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
1,623
SQFT
High Grove #203
4921 Lower Elm Street
Atlanta, GA 30349
$170,495
Townhouse For Sale
Active
3
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
1,623
SQFT
High Grove #204
4919 Lower Elm Street
Atlanta, GA 30349
$171,795
Townhouse For Sale
Active
3
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
1,623
SQFT
High Grove #205
4917 Lower Elm Street
Atlanta, GA 30349
$169,595
Townhouse For Sale
Active
3
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
1,467
SQFT
High Grove #206
4915 Lower Elm Street
Atlanta, GA 30249
$4,000,000
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
7
BED
9
TOTAL BATHS
15,159
SQFT
4690 Thompson Road
Atlanta, GA 30349
 
$12,500,000
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
9
BED
14
TOTAL BATHS
26,000
SQFT
4965 Butner Road
Atlanta, GA 30349
 
$263,000
Single Family Home For Sale
Pending
3
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
2,260
SQFT
3205 Camden Court
Atlanta, GA 30349
KINGSLAND Subdivision
Short Sale
$195,000
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
4
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
2,639
SQFT
432 Hammock Loop
Atlanta, GA 30349
 
Short Sale
$209,900
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
4
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
2,676
SQFT
2927 Chilhowee Drive
Atlanta, GA 30331
Legacy at Cascading Creek Subdivision
$245,700
Single Family Home For Sale
Pending
5
BED
4
TOTAL BATHS
2,404
SQFT
3492 Dacite Court
Atlanta, GA 30349
Flat Shoals Manor Subdivision
$162,490
Single Family Home For Sale
Active
4
BED
3
TOTAL BATHS
1,800
SQFT
6679 Mancha Street
Atlanta, GA 30349
Heritage Park Subdivision

Speak Your Mind

*

Web Analytics